Anxious Brains Are Inherited ? Founded In A Recent Study

BRAIN: The brain is the most important organ of the Human body. It is the most sensitive part of the human body, and every action of the human beings depends on the brain and functions carried by it. The brain function that underlies anxiety and depression is inherited, a new study finds ? but there is still plenty of space for experience and environment to reduce the risk of a full-blown mental disorder.

Anxious Brains Are Inherited ? Founded In A Recent Study :

The research focused on rhesus monkeys. Like humans, some young rhesus monkeys have what?s called an ?anxious temperment?. Expose them to a mildly stressful situation, like being in a room with a stranger, and the monkeys will stop moving and stop vocalizing while their stress hormones skyrocket. Extremely shy children do the same, said Dr. Ned Kalin, a psychiatrist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Anxious Brains Are Inherited ? Founded In A Recent Study

Anxious Brains Are Inherited ? Founded In A Recent Study

Kalin and his colleagues scanned the brains of young monkeys, anxious and not, and found three brain regions associated with anxiety that also showed evidence of heritability. About 30 percent of the variation in early anxiety is explained by family history, the researches reported Monday (July 6) in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Anxiety and depression are widespread disorders.

According to the national institute of mental health (NIMH), about 18 percent of US adults have experienced an anxiety disorder in the past year, and about 7 percent have had a major depressive episode. The average age of onset for anxiety disorders episode. The average age of onset for anxiety disorders is 11. [7 Thoughts That Are Bad for You].

Researches tell that the kids with extremely anxious temperament are at 50 percent risk of developing a mental disorder later in life, Kalin told Live Science. He and his colleagues are trying to figure out the brain basis of this temperament, in hopes of developing early interventions that can nudge kids away from anxiety and depression.