INTERNET OF THINGS (IoT)

The Internet of Things is the network of physical objects that contain embedded technology to communicate and sense or interact with their internal states or the external environment.

GETTING YOUR HOME ONLINE:
For example, a fridge connected to internet, so that you can control your refrigeirator temperature. Take a cooker connected to internet, so that you can turn on and off while away from home, and you get your meal ready, when you come back home. Utility companies wanted to control power systems in our homes, and remotely read our meters. Government wanted to implement Iot in order to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, and control certain devices.

INTERNET OF THINGS

INTERNET OF THINGS

Iot is even used where embedded sensors are used in upcoming GOOGLE GLASS.
This has been proposed years ago, but hasn?t advanced far and the pulling back factor is the COST. IoT will grow to 26 billion units by 2020, representing an almost 30-fold increase from 0.9 billion in 2009, as per IT research and advisory firm Gartner. CES 2014 will concentrate more on the IOT connected devices.

NETWORK CONSIDERATIONS:
There has been a strong move towards a standardized TCP/IP transport mechanism, which has started to erode the technology challenges to a real IoT. Modern PowerLine internet from the likes of Devolo and Solwise can provide networks of up to 500Mbps. Wireless standards are increasing bandwidth regularly, with 802.11n access points from suppliers such as TP-Link and Netgear capable of running at 600Mbps.

APPLICATIONS:
1) Advanced medical devices, factory automation sensors and applications in industrial robotics
2) Sensor motes for increased agricultural yield, and automotive sensors and infrastructure integrity monitoring systems for diverse areas, such as road and railway transportation, water distribution and electrical transmission.
3) Intelligent shopping, smart product management, smart meters, home automation and smart events.